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Womens Suffrage Movement

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Women’s Suffrage Movement
David Mondor
U.S. History 1865 to 1945
Paul Sadler
February 19, 2005
Abstract
The Women’s Suffrage Movement can trace its roots, back to Anne Hutchinson’s conviction and expulsion in 1637 for sedition in Massachusetts. This movement has had many achievements, disappointments, and internal disagreements, throughout its history, the right to vote given, then taken away, many times before it became enshrined in the United States Constitution. Through ratification by 36 states of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, women finally had the same rights as men, the right to be considered citizens and vote, the right to be considered equal to men. This struggle for equality and voting rights we discuss in this paper.
Women’s Suffrage Movement Women’s Suffrage in America began in 1637 when Anne Hutchinson dared to defy church leaders, with her thoughts on religion. This contemptuous display of women’s rights at a time when women were considered the property of men landed Anne, before a tribunal of men. They convicted her of ‘sedition’ and expelled her from Massachusetts’s colony. Mary Dyer, having been the only person to stand up for Anne during her trial, was also expelled a few months later from the colony, along with her husband William. In 1652 Mary Dyer visited England for five years and during that time she joined the Society of Friends, the Quaker religion founded by George Fox. Returning to New England, Dyer headed back to the Massachusetts’s Bay colony, to preach her newfound religion. Boston at the time had outlawed Quakers and in 1660, Governor John Endicott had her hanged for her religious beliefs (Kowalski, 2003, p. 33). The Women’s Suffrage Movement was starting in America. It was 1840, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her husband Henry traveled to England for their honeymoon and to attend the Anti-Slavery Convention. Elizabeth…...

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