Free Essay

Waiting Essay

In: Novels

Submitted By Agassi900
Words 2189
Pages 9
Shortly after the end of the Second World War, at the conclusion of the 1940s, Mao Zedong became the chairman of Communist China. Being that it was, and still is, the most inhabited country in the world, China becoming a communist country affected millions of people almost instantly. Many of the traditional traditions and practices of the Chinese people were left behind as Mao’s “Cultural Revolution” was instituted across the country in 1966. During the Cultural Revolution of China, the country and its citizens experienced strict authority control with the military and the state functioning together to govern the people. The switch from traditional China to this Cultural Revolution was swift and hasty, causing much death and trouble for the Chinese people. Because of these facts, there are many people who judged the New China governed under the socialist ideas of Mao. One of these critics is the Chinese-American novelist, Ha Jin, who denounces the Cultural Revolution of China in his novel entitled Waiting. In his novel, Ha Jin addresses and brings to light the affects of Mao’s rule on the Chinese people and the country as a whole. The novel starts in 1966 and takes place during the Cultural Revolution. “Cultural conflict is the center of this novel, where two worlds collide in the story of a man seeking a divorce from his wife by an arranged marriage: the ancient feudal culture of China and the world of the Cultural Revolution led by Chairman Mao” (Moore, 124). Through the locations, settings, and characters, Ha Jin illustrates the differences between the Old China and the New China for his American audience; there are many places and people in “Waiting” that represent these two divergent times in Chinese history. One way in which Ha Jin develops this idea is through the characters of Shuyu and Manna Wu, the two women Lin Kong must decide between throughout the novel. Shuyu, who lives in the countryside, is Lin Kong’s wife through a prearranged marriage and represents the conformist China of earlier years. Differing, Manna Wu is the nurse Lin meets in the city in the hospital where they both work; she represents the educated, modern woman influenced by the Cultural Revolution. Being that Shuyu dwells in the countryside and Manna in the city, these locations also become symbols used by Ha Jin to express his views of the times changing. “The novel reveals how the collision between the old world of rural China, where divorce is rare, and the new world of the Cultural Revolution thwarts Lin Kong's best efforts and creates the life we experience…”(Moore, 124). In using the countryside town of Goose Village, Ha Jin is able to show his inexperienced American readers how different life was before Mao. “Throughout the novel Ha Jin gives readers many opportunities to see the rural world and its cultural value systems untouched as yet by the Cultural Revolution” (Moore, 125). He shows how distinct different life was in Old China when Lin Kong is visiting his wife and daughter, Hua, in Goose Village; life in this village is always depicted as being calm and simple. In one scene, Shuyu prepares Lin’s parents’ favorite meals for him to deliver to their grave sights (Jin, 92-93). Such customs were long forgotten and never again practiced once Mao took control of the country. Also, in various parts of the book it is mentioned how divorces were hard to come across in the country. Ha Jin writes, “Divorces were rare in the country. The court could handle about a dozen cases a year, and only two or three would end in a divorce” (Jin, 10). Later on, the character Geng Yang is quoted as saying, “Divorces are rare in the countryside. I heard of only one divorce in my hometown…”(Jin, 166). These passages from the novel deliver how the mindsets and lives of the people in rustic China differed from those of the people in the city. Unlike Goose Village, life in the Muji city was changed drastically for women and men living under the watchful eyes of the Chinese military and government. “That change is set in the context of the Cultural Revolution, where the relationship between married military men and unmarried women is strictly controlled” (Moore, 124). Because superiors and those who worked for Chairman Mao, were extremely afraid to break the rules set in place, even if those rules upset their happiness. At the beginning of the novel, Jin explains the circumstances under which Lin and Manna were allowed to meet: “…they couldn’t live together and could only eat at the same table in the mess hall and take walks on the hospital grounds. The hospital’s regulations prohibited a man and a woman on the staff from walking together outside the compound, unless they were married or engaged” (Jin, 16). Even though Lin and Manna had projection to be married one day, they were not allowed to meet outside the hospital because Lin was a married guy. The heads of the hospital synchronized everything their employees did, making it unattainable for Lin and Manna to have a real relationship because they were “fearful of being punished”. The whole idea of the arranged marriage between Lin and Shuyu exemplifies this traditional role of women. “His father wanted Lin to get married soon so that his bride could look after his mother” (Jin, 8). This shows that Shuyu was simply needed by Lin’s father to take care of his ill wife while he worked in the fields; the entire marriage was instituted so the Kong’s could utilize Shuyu for their own benefit. Probably the most shocking aspect of this situation is Shuyu’s enthusiasm and eagerness to be married. She was never loved and never cared about by her husband, and yet never complained. It is deduced that these arranged marriages were typical occurrences in Old China. However, situations and arranged marriages like this never took place after the Cultural Revolution, when marriages were no longer arranged. Also, from the start of the novel, the readers are told that Shuyu’s feet are bound, even though the practice of binding a woman’s feet had ended a generation earlier: “This was the New China; who would look up to a woman with bound feet?”(Jin, 8). Despite this fact, Shuyu took great pride in her bound feet and would not take off her small shoes when visiting the hospital later on in the novel to show the young nurses her feet because “only her man’s allowed to see them” (Jin, 205). “The nurses at the hospital are amazed at her deep loyalty to her husband” (Moore, 126), which exemplifies other characteristics of traditional women: devotion and dedication. Shuyu’s entire life spins around her husband and the family they have. She saves some of the small amount of money Lin sends to her each month in order to give it back to him for his own personal use, even if it means living with less herself. She goes to him one night and offers to have a son for him, so that there is someone to take care of him in his old age. These actions of Shuyu show how committed she was to Lin and how everything she did was to help him and their family. Such reliability and affection was lost as the Cultural Revolution took effect. Ha Jin also points out another different attribute of women of Old China: their dependences and strong link to their husbands. He shows how dependent Shuyu is on her husband by elucidation that Shuyu doesn’t work and only lives off the money Lin sends her once a month. It is also said that Lin’s mother’s stone “carried only ‘Kong’s Wife.’ His mother had never had her own name” (Jin, 93). Both of these instances prove how much women used to depend on their husbands and how emotionally involved they really were to them. This is a huge contrast to the newfound independence of the women of the Cultural Revolution. Women of the New China, as it was under the Cultural Revolution, became products of the state; this is exemplified in the character of Manna Wu. Through the fictional city of Muji, where Lin and Manna live and work, “Ha Jin gives us in- sight into the mechanistic and dehumanizing world of the military that governs the lives of Lin and Manna Wu” (Moore, 125). Around this time, all women in China were “supposed to marry, even the retarded and the paralyzed were not exempted” (Jin, 99). Manna Wu was the exception, however; she was one of the oldest women working in the hospital, and who had yet to be married- behind her back people called her ‘a typical old maid. She was too old to marry any of the young, single men working in the hospital and found her last chance at marriage in Lin Kong, but because he was already married they were still talked about and scrutinized for their relationship. In the city, in such close immediacy to the government officials, Manna was trapped and stuck living under these rules and criticisms, which were set in place by the Cultural Revolution. The effects the Cultural Revolution had on the women of China are especially depicted in the section of the novel where Geng Yang rapes Manna Wu. The reader finds out that the only reason he does this despicable deed is because he knew Manna was a virgin. He took advantage of her knowing that he would never be punished for it because she Manna would never tell anyone of what happened to her out of fear. Geng Yang tells her that no one will ever believe her and she agrees with him saying, “I went to his room on my own accord. Wouldn’t they say I offered myself to him?” (Jin, 183). Manna was clearly afraid of revealing what happened to her to any sort of authority, knowing completely well that no one would take what she said seriously. When she eventually decided to confide in her friend, Haiyan, she is told, “It will be very hard to prove that you didn’t have a date with him unless Geng Yang admits the crime himself. You know a date rape is rarely treated as a rape” (Jin, 187). The women who lived under the rule of Mao and his Cultural Revolution grew to fear those around them to the point where they would not stand up for themselves because of fear of being judged and condemned. Being that Manna was already looked down upon by her superiors and peers because of her relationship with Lin, she refuses to allow him to inform anyone of the rape saying, “if people know of the rape, I’ll become cheaper in everyone’s eyes, and I’ll belong to a different category, lower than a widow” (Jin. 194). The Cultural Revelation obviously rattled the women who lived so close to those who governed their country, making them fearing their power and influence of those people above them; they worried more of what those around them those around them thought, than their own personal and individual wants and needs. In conclusion, Ha Jin’s Waiting explores the changes that took place as a result of the Cultural Revolution in China by comparing characters and settings throughout the novel. “In Waiting, Ha Jin continues his mission of dissecting society in "the Old Country"- that is, China as he left it, fifteen years ago. Waiting begins with an absurd impasse of the sort the author excels at creating, quintessentially Maoist but also universally human” (Kinkley. 579). The author develops this idea by presenting the two different locations of Goose Village, representing Old China, and Muji City, representing the New China. He illustrates life in Goose Village as serene and effortless, being unscathed by the influenced of the Cultural Revolution instituted by Mao. However, in contrast, life in Muji city is completely regulated, making causing all those who live there to be fearful of the power of those above them. Ha Jin also addresses the change from the Old China to the New China, caused by the Cultural Revolution, through the characters of Shuyu and Manna Wu. Mao depicts Shuyu as the traditional Chinese woman almost completely oblivious to the changing times around her, while the Cultural Revolution would forever influence Manna’s life put in place. Ha Jin, being a critic of many aspects of the New China, wrote about his views in this novel, showing his audience how much the Old China differed from the New China he was brought up in. In the end, “this Waiting “is a saga on how the country and city, … can conspire to perpetuate dull misery” (Kinkley, 579).

Works Cited

Jin, Ha. Waiting. New York, NY: Vintage, 2000.

Print.Kinkley, Jeffrey C. "World Literature in Review: Asia and the Pacific." World Literature Today 3rd ser. 74 (2000): 579-80. JSTOR. Web. 7 Feb. 2011

Moore, John N. "The Landscape of Divorce: When Two Worlds Collide." The English Journal 92.2 (2002): 124-27. JSTOR. Web. 8 Feb. 2011.…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Waiting for Godot

...Pastiche on Waiting for Godot The Theatre of the Absurd is a style of writing which portrays human life as a meaningless and futile existence resulting in one’s inevitable death. Similar to the Lost Generation movement created as a result of the death and destruction of World War I, the Theatre of the Absurd is a reaction to World War II in which the war survivors felt as though death was inevitable and therefore nothing in one’s existence mattered since material possessions would not travel with one after death. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting For Godot exemplifies the characteristics of the Theatre of the Absurd, not only through its content and dialogue, but also through its language and structure. The structure of dialogue chosen by Beckett, mixes short and concise sentences with meaningful ideas and opinions about the human condition. Although the dialogue appears to be an illogical banter, it would be a mistake to make the assumption that it has no meaning. For instance, throughout the play, Estragon and Vladimir repeat the lines “nothing to be done” and “nothing happens.” Such references along with the cyclical nature of the dialogue, suggest Beckett’s vision that human existence is bleak and that nothing significant ever really happens in our lifetimes, but instead the same situations are repeated throughout life. Beckett’s style revolutionizes the traditional play as he deviates from the orthodox playwright by creating a play with no central plot or storyline. There is no...

Words: 1145 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Waiting

...Waiting… I was waiting for my dad to come and pick me up. He was never late, so I thought that there was something wrong with the car or his boss wanted to talk to him about something. I didn’t call him because if he was talking to his boss, then I didn’t want to interrupt him. My mom called to tell me that she was coming to pick me up. She came a little while after she called. When I got in the car I asked her where’s dad, but she didn’t say a word. I started to worry about dad. We went home and my mom said to me: “Emily, I have to tell you something.” I was sure that it was about dad. Something bad had happened to him. “Honey, your dad has been sent to Afghanistan this morning with the U.S Army. Don’t worry, he will be okay. “said mom. I could hear the pain in her voice. “How long is he staying? “I asked with tears in my eyes. “Probably… 6-7 months, but he is coming back for a while to visit us and then he will leave again, but I don’t know for how long this time.” Said mom. I really missed dad. We used to do everything together. On Saturdays and Sundays, we used to walk the dogs, have a little picnic. The first days the pain was stronger. It made me sick and weak. I was really worried about him, because he might get hurt… or worse. I couldn’t stand his ......

Words: 494 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Waiting for Love

...In life, you find that people have good intentions and mean well, however, there are those who may only pretend to do so. The story, “Waiting for Love” by Cheryl Albury, portrays two individuals that seem to want to spend the rest of their lives together. Phyllis, the main character, is introduced to Stafford as she runs an errand that is related to her job as a training seamstress. Stafford McPhee, a charming policeman, won the heart of Phyllis. Phyllis and Stafford organized a wedding and a vacation for themselves. Stafford never came to pick up Phyllis to go to the airport. She stood there waiting until nightfall, hence, the title “Waiting for Love.” Cheryl Albury portrayed Stafford McPhee as a “wolf in sheep’s clothing”. Meaning, Stafford hid his malicious intent (dumping Phyllis after she became in love with him) under the disguise of his kindness. In the beginning of the story, Stafford was the “sheep” (good person) He was seen as a perfect gentleman in Phyllis’ eyes. He was kindhearted, considerate, and had the characteristics of a potential husband. Stafford would walk Phyllis to work and then home everyday. He took her out on dates. He always said the right thing that Phyllis wanted to hear. Stafford was constantly punctual. The author also portrayed him as a storyteller. He would tell Phyllis a story on all of their dates (usually having to do with something they see on the date). By the ending of the story, Stafford was seen as a “wolf” (bad person). He was not...

Words: 659 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Waiting for Balance: a Review of Waiting for Superman

...________________________________________________________________________ Waiting for Balance: A Review of Waiting for Superman Directed by Davis Guggenheim Paramount Vantage and Participant Media, 2010. Approximately 90 minutes. ________________________________________________________________________ Reviewed by Joseph Flynn, Northern Illinois University Introduction Waiting for Superman is the latest documentary by the Academy Award winning director Davis Guggenheim. Guggenheim also directed An Inconvenient Truth, the Al Gore documentary about climate change and global warming. What made An Inconvenient Truth such a masterwork was that it presented stark and incontrovertible information about the destruction of our environment and further challenged the viewers to do something about it. Waiting for Superman follows a similar formula. It presents the viewer with an incredible amount of troubling information about our public schools and models of seemingly progressive advocates for change. The data represented is also properly cited on-screen, differentiating it from personal polemics like Michael Moore’s Bowling for Columbine and Fahrenheit 9-11. It concludes with a challenge to act for the best interests of our nation’s youths; the end credits include a web site where viewers can go for ideas. That makes it difficult to speak negatively about the film, but upon a closer analysis we find that most of the information presented in the film is over-generalized and highly......

Words: 3762 - Pages: 16

Free Essay

Waiting for Superman

...Essay 1: Reviews Essay For this semester project I chose the documentary, Waiting for Superman. This film was directed by Davis Guggenheim, and released in Hollywood, CA in the year 2010. The reviews I selected that were most compelling to me were “Waiting for Superman Movie Review,” published by Roger Ebert, “School Spirit Waiting for Superman,” published by the New Yorker, and “Waiting for Superman: Are Teachers the Problem?,” published by TIME Entertainment. I was able to access all three of my chosen reviews online, and they were published in the same year as the film was released. Through analyzing the three reviews on Waiting for Superman, one major trend between them is that they agree there is some problem with our nation’s public schools system, and the reforms such as No Child Left Behind and receiving tenure contribute to this problem. Agreeing with the ideas presented in Waiting for Superman and these reviews, I feel that the problems existing in our schools could be solved with more funding to provide teachers with higher pay. The first review, published by Roger Ebert, focuses on the main argument of how our nation’s funding could change to better our public education programs. For example, “Spend less money on prisons and more money on education. Reduce our military burden and put that money into education. In 20 years, you would have more useful citizens, less crime and no less national security. It's so simple”(Roger Ebert). This was Roger Ebert’s......

Words: 1188 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

The Deconstruction of Waiting for Go Dot

...Deconstructive literary criticism uses binary oppositions. Binary oppositions can be defined as “ a pair of related terms or concepts that are opposite in meaning.” “Waiting for Godot”, a classic of modern theatre, is a tragicomedy in two acts which tells the story of two men, Vladimir and Estragon, who are waiting to meet a man named Godot. By using deconstructive literary criticism, the play can be analyzed threw the following binary oppositions: passive/active hopelessness/hope, forgetfulness/remembrance and staying/going. Vladimir and Estragon are in a constant state of waiting for Godot: “Nothing to be done. / I'm beginning to come round to that opinion."(Waiting for Godot). Although they are being passive they try to occupy themselves while waiting for Godot. Derrida states that in binary oppositions there is a unspoken hierarchy in which the first term functions as superior to the second term which is considered inferior: “ Derrida’s procedure is to invert the hierarchy in which the first term functions as privileged and superior and the second term as derivative and inferior. By showing that the primary term can be made out to be derivative from or a special case of the secondary term” By reversing the first term with the second a greater meaning can obtained. Although Vladimir and Estragon as in a passive state of waiting they attempt to keep active in order to pass the time. This shows that being active is valued over being passive: “ What about trying them. /......

Words: 1146 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Waiting for Godot

...Waiting For Godot – the absurdity Beckett is considered to be an important figure among the French Absurdists. "Waiting for Godot" is one of the masterpieces of Absurdist literature. Elements of Absurdity for making this play are so engaging and lively. Beckett combats the traditional notions of Time. It attacks the two main ingredients of the traditional views of Time, i.e. Habit and Memory. We find Estragon in the main story and Pozzo in the episode, combating the conventional notions of Time and Memory. For Pozzo, particularly, one day is just like another, the day we are born indistinguishable from the day we shall die.    It is very clear from the very word "Absurd" that it means nonsensical, opposed to reason, something silly, foolish, senseless, ridiculous So, a drama having a cock and bull story would be called an absurd play. Moreover, a play having loosely constructed plot, unrecognizable characters, metaphysical called an absurd play. Actually the 'Absurd Theatre' believes that humanity's plight is purposeless in an existence, which is out of harmony with its surroundings.   This thing i.e. the awareness about the lack of purpose produces a state of metaphysical anguish which is the central theme of the Absurd Theatre. On an absurd play logical construction, rational ideas and intellectually viable arguments are abandoned and instead of these the irrationality for experience is acted out on the stage.   The above mentioned discussion allows us to call......

Words: 674 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Waiting for Sex

...Topic: Waiting for sex. *note: An earlier version of the class textbook is used, pages and chapters may not match* In today times, sex is a more open topic amongst my peers and our parents. In our parents’ times, sex was taken by a more traditional approach; waiting to be fully and completely in love with your significant other and eventually marrying that individual to engage in any sexual activities. In today’s society, the engagement of sexually activities can start as early as the age of 13 where no real connection with their partner is taking place and the subject of sex and premarital sex is becoming more accepted by all. Despite today’s culture of fickle sexual relationships, I believe in a more traditional view and the romantic ideal of waiting for love/marriage before sex. Traditional sexual morality is that of waiting till being truly and completely in love with a person while also planning to be with that person for a long time to have sex. To me, the simple act of sex is supposed to mean “I trust you and love you with all I have”. In today’s society, many people are engaging in sexual encounters with people left and right; having sex with just anyone. The act of it becomes less and less important and looses its value and meaning. With every sexual partner one has, each person becomes less and less special. Not only is that unsafe but it is also skanky, for lack of a better word. In chaste sexual relationship, the desire for the other special individual......

Words: 629 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Waiting for Lefty

...Festa Mr. Smith Theatre 23 April, 2012 Theatre (extra credit paper) – “Waiting for Lefty” My intentions going into the play were that it was not going to interest me at all. Personally, I am not a big fan of watching other kids act out a play. I have gone to many plays in high school where my friends were performing, and I was bored and not impressed by the production. However, this play actually surprised me with how good the acting was. The students were really into their characters and made me believe there emotions were real. In comparison with high school I felt as though kids were holding back and embarrassed to really get into the play. Something I was not that impressed with was the scenery, though. I was expecting there to actually be background objects, not just a wall with screen projections. I do not think it took away from the play at all though, I was just expecting something different. Another good part about the play was the clothes that they wore. I felt like everyone’s costumes were appropriate for the time and all fit them well. I even noticed in one scene the girl’s bra strap fell down which was not supposed to happen, but she just fixed it right away and continued as if nothing happened. Overall, the students’ great acting skills in “Waiting for Lefty”, “Sure Thing”, and “The Philadelphia” really impressed me and got me into the play. I almost felt as though it was real life in “Waiting for Lefty”, but that could also have been because the play......

Words: 929 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Waiting for the Barbarians

...Poem: “Waiting For The Barbarians” by Constantine P. Cavafy The poem “Waiting For The Barbarians” is a very unique poem. The poem is very basic and easy to follow but there is a deeper meaning within the text. After reading the poem, it is very clear that it is about a question and answer "Q&A" session regarding the arrival of the barbarians. The structure of the poem shows how the poem takes place at a Q&A session. It is quite evident that the question askers are a group of citizens and the answerer is a messenger. Lines that begin with a dash are the questions and the lines that start with because are the answers to the questions. The questions are usually in couplets or quatrains, which the exception of one. Although the structure is neat, it doesn’t play a huge part in the meaning of poem. When reading this poem aloud, it becomes very clear that sound doesn’t have a role in this poem. There is no alliteration, assonance, or onomatopoeias whatsoever. But the poem does have a nice flow for a Q&A session. Cavafy does use quite a bit of imagery for this poem. Due to the historical context of this poem, it is no surprise that the imagery has a historical twist. When reading this poem, it is very easy to picture a Greek village ready to surrender to the barbarians who are supposedly coming that day. Back in ancient Greece, many villages gave into the barbarians as they didn’t want to risk losing many men to a somewhat hopeless cause. There is also some very......

Words: 630 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Waiting for Godot

...ANALYZING THE CONCEPT OF DERRIDA’S DECONSTRUCTION IN SAMUEL BECKETT’S WAITING FOR GODOT ANALYZING THE CONCEPT OF DERRIDA’S DECONSTRUCTION IN SAMUEL BECKETT’S WAITING FOR GODOT Deconstruction is a literary theory and philosophy of language derived principally from Jacques Derrida's 1967 work Of Grammatology. The premise of deconstruction is that all of Western literature and philosophy implicitly relies on a metaphysics of presence, where intrinsic meaning is accessible by virtue of pure presence. Deconstruction rejects the possibility of a pure presence and thus of essential or intrinsic meaning. Due to the impossibility of pure presence and consequently of intrinsic meaning, any given concept is constituted and comprehended from the linguistic point of view and in terms of its oppositions, e.g. perception/reason, speech/writing, mind/body, interior/exterior, marginal/central, sensible/intelligible, intuition/signification, nature/culture. Derrida says that one member is associated with presence (more highly emphasized) while the other is associated with absence. He proposes “difference” - a perpetual series of interactions between presence and absence - where a concept is constituted, comprehended and identified in terms of what it is not and self-sufficient meaning is never arrived at. Derrida's theories on deconstruction were influenced by the work of linguists such as Ferdinand de Saussure and literary theorists such as Roland Barthes (whose works were an......

Words: 2164 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Waiting for Superman

...Waiting for Superman This is a documentary movie which portrays the shortage of public education system in the United States. People who are live in the poverty are the principal victims of public education system. Students receive different standard education is because good public schools are not allow every students get in and bad teachers in public schools are less efficient than good teachers in good public schools. For example, the movie portrays students who are poor and not from the neighborhood, they do not have choice to go to private schools, the only way is apply the good public schools, due to there are many people to apply, they have to wait for being chosen by lottery. The movie also shows that teachers in good public schools can finish 150 percent curriculum in one year, but teachers in ordinary public schools can only finish 50 percent curriculum. In brief, schools and bad teachers widen the disparities between students, and parents lack of choice to move their children out of failing schools. In Bad Teacher , Kumashiro(2012) states that “Michelle Rhee fire the lazy and incompetent teachers, and Barack Obama urged that it is time for rewarding good teachers, stop making excuses for bad teachers (Page11, Paragraph 1).” In another words, bad teachers are black sheep in the public education, good teaches are hero. If all bad teachers are dismissed, then public education system can be improved. In fact, this is not an assumption which people made, it is......

Words: 281 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Waiting to Exhale

...Destiny J. Green SOC 501 Critical Reaction: Critical Race Theory “Waiting to Exhale…” While delving into the assigned literature for this week, I noticed that it controlled me—my soul sometimes evoked a sense of pride, waves of applause, but most of all, anger. I immediately became aware of the forced sense of solidarity that I am assigned, the voice that always whispers to me when one of “us” appears intelligent: “Yes, these authors made us look like we had some sense! Look how analytical they sounded!” But why on earth do I have to feel like that in this marvelous, post racial society? After reading, I noticed that despite the year tacked on to the assigned readings, the content barely changed. From Dubois (1903) to Wingfield and Feagin (2012), we are still acknowledging the same woes that a society assigns particular groups of people. We are still attempting to come up with dire solutions in hopes that everyone will begin to “get along” with one another. But most of all, because of this…People of color are still waiting to exhale. In this essay, there will be two parts: Firstly, a general analysis of the assigned literature for this week. In this compartment of my paper, I will analyze extracted points from the readings thematically as it directly relates to certain points in the “Critical Race: An Introduction” excerpt. Here, I will also be giving a respectful critique of Dubois’ postulations in the “Souls of Black Folk.” Secondly I will critique Allport’s (1954)...

Words: 3445 - Pages: 14

Premium Essay

Waiting for Godot

...Logan McGeady 14 October 2014 ENG 121-020 Essay #2 Nothing To Be Done The play Waiting For Godot by Samuel Beckett engages the idea of what it means to be human and how meaningless life can really be. Beckett uses literary techniques to show that human life is based on chance, time is meaningless, and that people will impose meaning on life to distract themselves from the fact that their situation is unalterable. The realization of this drives the characters to rely on outside forces, which may or may not be real, for order and direction. The basic proposition Beckett imposes in the play is that chance is the main factor behind existence and human life. Therefore life is determined by chance and there Is nothing Vladimir or Estragon can do that can influence their life. This is established when Vladimir alludes to the story of the two thieves from the Bible. "One is supposed to have been saved… and the other…damned” (Beckett 4). The idea of percentage is important because this represents how the fate of humanity is determined randomly and without any reason. There is a percentage chance that a person will be saved and sent to heaven or damned and sent to hell, taking away meaning of human life and simply categorizing people into those who are saved, and those who are damned. Vladimir continues by citing the fault in the Gospels on the story of the two thieves. "And yet…[pause]…how is it that of the four Evangelists only one speaks of a thief being saved. The four of......

Words: 954 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Waiting on the Lord

...your situation or question, God has a plan and a way to bring us out. And we find ourselves waiting for a change to take place. For most of us, we'd rather do anything than wait. That is the source of many problems for us. When we get impatient we sometimes move too quickly or in the wrong direction. Most of us would rather do anything than wait. Some of us would rather do the wrong thing than wait. Truth be told, most of life is waiting. Waiting for an appointment to see the doctor. Waiting to graduate. Waiting to be accepted in college. Waiting for your first job offer. Waiting to see if the bank will give you a loan. Waiting for the right time to start a family. Waiting for the Lord to bring the right man or the right woman into your life. Waiting to find out what God wants you to do. Waiting for someone to buy your house. Waiting for your prayers to be answered. Waiting for your husband to come home, waiting for your children to act right. Waiting is one of the hardest acts of life. Yet we all spend a big part of our lives waiting for things to happen. We all have to wait whether we like it or not. No one likes to wait, especially in today’s time. For everything that we do is based on the response to time. Most everything comes to us instantly, whether it is food or information. If something is not happening, fast enough then we attempt to make it happen ourselves! Waiting is part of what it means to be human. We waited to be born and we also have to wait to die....

Words: 2447 - Pages: 10