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The History of Art and Roman Verism

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Submitted By danielle158212
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1. Roman Verism was often used by the Romans in marble sculptures of heads. Verism, often described as "warts and all", shows the imperfections of the subject, such as warts, wrinkles and furrows. “The beautiful head of the Buddha, with its expression of deep repose, was also made in the frontier region of Gandhara. (Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art. 97. Print.)” “This attention to realistic detail almost exaggerating the effect of aging on people is a characteristic of Roman sculpture (Watson, Mark. "Part I." Week 4 Lecture. .Lecture.).

2. “Through the course of Roman history was a transition of a republican model of government to a vast empire that conquered the entire Mediterranean and invested a great deal in one man, an emperor (Watson, Mark. “Part I." Week 4 Lecture. .Lecture.). Victory columns and triumphal arches depict this power and stability of the empire and can be categorized as t. Triumphal arches were monumental symbolic arches built over the top of Main Street and the Roman Empire. “The triumphal arches use the orders frame and accent the large central gateway and to flank it by narrow openings. It was an arrangement that could be used for architectural composition much as a chord used in music (Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art. 94. Print.)” Victory columns. The victory columns were columns that were put up to show their victories in various wars. The columns were representation of more modern architecture. You can literally step inside from the bottom through the door and work your way to the top where there would be a sculpture of whom the victory was dedicated to.

3. Each empire had their own style. Egyptian architecture involved pyramids and the burying of the dead as mummies. Romans were all about columns and arches. “This invention had played little or no part in Greek buildings though it may have been known to Greek architects…...

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