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Statistics on Falls

In: Social Issues

Submitted By siobhanc
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Statistic/Fact of Trips, Slips and fall;

Over 540,000 Slip-Fall injuries, requiring hospital care, occur in North America each year.
Slip-Falls account for over 300,000 disabling injuries per year in North America.
One in three serious bone breaks for seniors result in death, within one year of the accident.
Slip-Falls account for over 20,000 fatalities per year in North America i.e. 55 persons per day.
It is the second leading cause of accidental death and disability after automobile accidents.

Reference; http://hspsupplyinc.com/stats.htm How to prevent Slips, Trips and Falls;

In a nursing home it is most important that you take all precautions into sight. Elderly people or those with disabilities may find the simplest of things hard by wearing footwear that is appropriate for the conditions inside and outside may prevent them from slipping or falling and hurting themselves on wet or very smooth surfaces. It is not only the people in the home the staff also need to take safety procedures as well by avoiding wearing high heels you will be saving yourself from falling on snowy, icy and rainy days. Try to wear boots Walk, don’t run through work areas, this is a major problem as there are residents in the care home which may struggle as it is to make it from one place to another and if they were to see someone flustering and running around them they may loose balance very easily and this again could result in a slip , trip or a fall. When possible, stay on marked travel aisles and paths. Don’t take “shortcuts” around machinery and equipment. Avoid areas that are cluttered or dimly lit.
When carrying a load makes sure you can see over and around it. Scan the area ahead and plan your travel path. Get help to carry heavy or awkward objects. Use carts or other mechanical aids.

Reference;…...

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