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Psychopathology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By makoma
Words 279
Pages 2
NAME: MARY SESHABELA
STUDENT NO. : 508 252 16
MODULE: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
CODE: PYC 4802

ASSIGNMENT 2
QUESTION:
Discuss problems related to identifying/diagnosing and the assessment of depression in adolescents, taking into account gender and contextual factors.

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 2. MOOD DISORDERS 3.1 Major depressive Disorder (MDD) 3.2 Dysthymic disorder 3.3 Bipolar I 3.4 Bipolar II 3.5 Cyclothymic disorder 3. Clinical description and prevalence of depression in childhood and adolescents 4. Symptoms and diagnosis in childhood and adolescents 4.1 Diagnostic problems 4.2 Developmental problems 4.3 Family factors 5. Treatment of childhood and adolescent depression 6. Conclusion 7. References

REFERENCES
Barlow, D.H., & Durand, V.M. (2009). Abnormal Psychology: An integrative Approach ( 5th Ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Barlow, D.H., & Durand, V.M. (2012). Abnormal Psychology: An integrative Approach ( 6th Ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Crowe, M., Ward, N., Dunnachie,B., & Roberts, M. (2006).Characteristics of adolescent depression. International Journal of mental Health Nursing, 15, 10-18.
Han, W.J.,& Miller, D.P.(2009). Parental work schedules and adolescent depression.
Health sociology Review, 18, 36-49
Kring, A.M,. Johnson, S.L., Davison, G.C. & Neale, J.M.(2013). Abnormal psychology (12th ed.). Singapore: Wiley and Sons.
Kronenberger, W.G. & Meyer, R.G.(2001). The child clinician’s handbook (2nd Ed.). Boston, M.A: Allyn and Bacon.
Mash, E.J.,& Wolfe, D.A. (2013). Abnormal Psychology (5th Ed.).Belmont : Wadsworth.
Nevid, J.S., Rathus, S.A., & Greene, B.(2011). Abnormal Psychology in a changing world (8thEd.). New York: Pearson.
Nolen- Hoekskema, S. (2011). Abnormal Psychology (5th Ed.). New York: Mc…...

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