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Liberalism, Romanticism, Feminism

In: Historical Events

Submitted By erickamarie1
Words 422
Pages 2
Change is inevitable. Even in todays day and age we deal with change every day. But if fact everyone has a different way of dealing with those changes. Liberalism, Romanticism, Feminism, and Social Darwinism all had their own individual ways of thinking and dealing with what was happening around them. Each way different, but as unique as the next.

Liberalism became popular during the Industrial revolution especially with Factory owners, as the demand for workers was always much less than the supply. Capitalism was all the justification they needed to operate their factories and deal with their employees as they saw fit. Liberals didn't believe in violence to take action. Liberals of tthis time era believed the government give society freedom as they tried to figure themselves out as individuals. Liberal also believed that the prices of goods should be based off the demand for the product. Which clearly what was going on with the ruling and working class was going against everything the liberals believed in.

Throughout this modernization it brought about many major changes in the way society lived. One of the many influences was the awakening of the female mind. With the rapid changes being brought about in the financial industry and the woman movement, a lot of attention was being brought to this all around. The typical role of woman that everyone was used to; the traditional submissive, dependent and the childbearing quickly changed to the modern woman demanding equal rights, authority, and independence. Modernization changed the roles of woman. They became more of what we see today. It is for these woman we have to thank for where we are right now.

Socialism was basically a response to the industrial revolution. It came about as workers didn't like the conditions in which they worked in. Workers lost control over their own working lives, and had to work…...

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