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Ion Beam Machining

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Submitted By vijayanand
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The unit on micro-machining (μ-machining) deals with the removal of material in very small quantities. Most of the time, the processes involved in μ-machining are used mainly for finishing purposes rather than correcting the dimensions. These processes are also used for making micro-miniature-components. During some of these processes, material is removed at atomic or molecular level specially in ion beam machining and elastic emission machining. In case of electron beam machining, material removal takes place due to thermal erosion. Here, the size of beam is so small that even a few micron size diameter holes can be drilled, thousands in numbers, in a few seconds. This process is suitable for μ-hole drilling in very thin electrically conducting as well as non-conducting sheets. But these processes cannot be employed for finishing large size components. Magnetic abrasive finishing process can be used to produce sub-micron (as low as 8-10 nm) level surface finish on flat and cylindrical (internal as well as external) surfaces. However, to transfer the patterns one would need a process like chemical machining. For example, to produce ICs or very large scale integrated circuits, one has to use photochemical machining which has gone through many developments recently.
An ion beam is a type of charged particle beam consisting of ions. Ion beams have many uses in electronics manufacturing (principally ion implantation) and other industries ..Ion beam machining takes place in a vacuum chamber, with charged atoms (ions) fired from an ion source towards a target (the work piece) by means of an accelerating voltage. The process works on principles similar to electron beam machining, the mechanism of material removal is quite different. Ion beam machining (IBM) is closely associated with the phenomenon of sputtering.…...

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