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Erik Erickson: Psychological Development Theory

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Erik Erikson: Psychosocial Development Theory
MGMT. 8010 – Management in Human and Societal Development
Winter Quarter, 2011
Dr. Kenneth C. Sherman, Professor

Everett Cordy, everett.cordy@waldenu.edu
Student ID Number: A00186883
Walden University

December 9, 2011

Abstract In this exercise, I explore the Psychosocial Development Theory of Erik Erikson. An explanation is given as to why this particular theory was selected for focus, and why Erickson appeals to me, both personally and professionally. Lastly, five (5) scholarly resources (in APA format), that I will consult as I begin to explore Erickson, are appended.

Erik Erikson: Psychosocial Development Theory I chose Erik Erikson as the theorist to study. I chose Erik Erikson because his psychosocial development theory is applicable to a wide-range of management situations where understanding how personality and behavior are developed and manifested is valued. I am interested to find out if Erikson’s development model can be applied in my research fields of interests of Employment Law and Conflict Resolution Management. Please find attached hereto a list of five (5) scholarly sources that I will consult as I begin to explore Erik Erikson.

References
Cornett, C. (2000). Ideas and identities: The life and work of Erik Erikson/Identities architect: A biography of Erik H. Erikson, Clinical Social Work Journal, 28(1), pp. 123-128.
Dunkel, C. and Sefcek, J. (2009). Eriksonian lifespan theory and life history: An integration using the example of identity formation. Review of General Psychology, 13 (1), pp. 13 – 23.
Erikson, E. (1959). Identity and the life cycle. New York: International Universities Press.
Saltzman, C. (2002). Review of “Erik Erikson: His life, work and…...

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