Premium Essay

Cultural Anthropology

In: Other Topics

Submitted By mushiri
Words 1406
Pages 6
1. Provide a description of gender equality as it exists in different cultures with (2) two examples. Also describe your own culture and relate this to the role of gender equally in one of the example you have described.
Gender equality is described as a status in which men and women enjoy equal opportunities and rights in all sectors in a society, this includes decision making, economic participation, politics, and in different behaviors where men and women’s needs and aspirations are all valued and favored equally. Nevertheless, different culture treats men and women in certain ways in line with their tradition or religion. In The United Arab Emirates countries most of the countries here strictly follow the Muslim faith, with these, women’s freedom are restricted. They are not treated as equal being with men being given absolute power and authority. This gives them the right to discipline their spouses which is a tradition and a way of life here, and that’s how men and women are brought up. Women have little access to higher education and they seem to be content with it since most do not know about their rights. Leaders are male and thus always enforce laws that favor them. In this culture gender equality is when women’s observe the set rules and adhere to the traditions.
In African tradition gender equality is none issue since women are disregarded here since tradition plays a key role in how they conduct their business. Here there are roles and work for certain gender, women are to work at home and be the custodian of her husband’s properties. Girls are made to marry early with no right to choose for their preferred partner. Male are the head and leaders whose decisions are final. In the African culture different roles and works for both Gender defines gender equality.
Here in the US we are much advanced on gender equality. Women are given equal…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Cultural Anthropology

...In the typical American household, Americans consider themselves equally tied by kinship to both their mother and father and their maternal and paternal relatives. In other words, Americans think of kinship bilaterally. As we shall see, this is not true of all societies. The writer focused on family life in three societies: the Ju/wasi, the Trobriand Islanders, and the traditional Chinese farm family. The ju/wasi were hunters and gatherers living in small mobile groups, where as the Trobriand Islanders were horticulturists living in villages of up to 400 people. As inferred in the text the chinese were the strongest of the three because they represent a large agricultural society. Wealth is important to maintain the social rank of the matrilineage. Wealth has no role among the Ju/wasi. Life, love, and wealth play a significant role in these societies today. Most anthropologist would argue that though these practices are from a earlier time they are still used today. Consequently, family stability must be maintained to increase wealth and social status. Lee's The Dobe(Holt, Rinehart and winston, 1984), Robbins PGS 182, 185 The Analysis Of Domestic Groups PGA 161-180 Because family structure is most important in typical families, we study the different domestic groups of three seperate social societies. Usually in these socities their are arranged marriages from birth and rarely disputed by the female as inferred in the reading. Wealth is not a main component to the Ju/wasi......

Words: 351 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Cultural Anthropology

...Cultural Anthropology 1. Anthropologists define culture as all the learned behaviours, beliefs, attitudes, values and ideals of a particular society or population. 2. All cultures share common characteristics such as politics, economics, family, communication, recreation, war, knowledge, beliefs and material culture. 3. Nature: the influence of inherited biological characteristics on human behaviour. Nurture: the process of training and influencing a child through learning. 4. Arapesh: * Children were treated warmly and that both men and women participated actively in child care * Both genders grew up to view the world in a trusting way * Aggression was not acceptable Mundagumor: * Both girls and boys were treated harshly and left to fend for themselves * Women and men grew up to be hostile and aggressive * Gentle individuals were seen as maladjusted Tchambuli: * Women were tough while men were passive * Men looked after the children and the household * Girls were trained in handicrafts and were absorbed into women’s way of life * Boys were given no training for their future roles * Adult women later formed a cohesive group * Boys were excluded from major ceremonies Mead concluded that most of the personality traits we associate with “masculinity” and “femininity” are the result of early learning, not heredity. Therefore, nurture rather than nature was determining human behaviour. 5. 1) Most......

Words: 1122 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Wedding Practices Ant 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

...  Have you ever wondered what other cultures did at their wedding ceremonies? Our traditional wedding ceremonies may be the “norm” to us but what is everyone else’s like? Something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue may not be for everyone. In my research paper I will be finding three different cultural wedding styles and explaining them to you. I will compare the different wedding practices to ours. I will explain why it is important for different cultures to have their own wedding practices. Lastly I will close in how important marriage is to every culture. We all are pretty familiar with our traditional wedding ceremonies in the United States but I have been curious of the wedding ceremonies that have been going on around the world. I am here to research and take a deeper look into them. The first one I found very interesting is from China. “In modern China, brides pick not one wedding dress, but three. First, there's the traditional qipao or cheongsam, an embroidered, slim-fitting frock that's usually made red for weddings, because red is a strong, lucky color in Chinese culture. Next, the bride might swap into a white poufed ball gown that wouldn't look out of place at an American wedding — a bridal nod to the popularity of Western trends. Finally, the bride ducks out of the reception to change into a third dress, this one a gown of her color choice or a cocktail dress.”(Pappas, 2011, para. 1). The second one I found is in Africa.......

Words: 1668 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Cultural Anthropology

...Cultural Anthropology Cultural violence Introduction Sometimes it hasn’t been clear whether the source of violence in most of the communities has been genetic human condition or introduced into our system after birth. Both factor contribute to violence and also define the nature of violence. This makes crimes to differ with different people, locations and cultures through time. Our point of study is Kohistan community located in the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan .we are going to study factors that facilitated crime in this area and how the crimes are associated with their cultures from the past. Kohistans interpret violence differently due to different cultural background from the rest of the world. I categorized the factors leading to violence in Kohistan into three. These factors include political, ecological and religious. Thull community is involves around 6000 Muslims and is located in the Hindu-Kush Mountains. The community is located 40 kilometers along the river valley. The road leading to the community is very poor. The community does farming of crops through irrigation and also keeps livestock that graze at the foot of the mountain where there smooth meadows. As per their tradition men were responsible for farming while the women worked on the crops. They practiced transhumance pastoral farming. Religion Initially the Thull community did not have a high crime rate as they settled their differences without any......

Words: 881 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Anthropology

...Deidra Miller ID No.: 6797830 Essay Questions Assignment Question 1: To what extent do members of a group share a single culture? Culture is a very crucial concept in anthropology and some might interpret that all cultural anthropologist share a single definition. However, there was only one study conducted in history during the 1950s that showed 164 various meanings of the simple word by scholars (Miller et. al., 2009:14). Other studies have shown that a part of defining culture is to say that it is learned. As Dr. Bambi Schieffelin and Dr. Elinor Ochs basically state, individuals of a certain culture “learn” through their parents and/or social interactions what their culture is or should be, (Jourdan C., Lesson 3: slide 7). However, while one learns what their culture is, they sometimes divert and create their own ways of interpreting (like the 164 cultural anthropologists) what it means or even form a culture of their own based on what they have interpreted from learning. Sir Edward Tylor is a British anthropologist who declared the very first definition of culture in 1871. He suggested that it “is that complex whole which one includes knowledge, belief, art, law, morals, custom, and any other capabilities and habits required by man as a member of society” (Miller et. al., 2009:14). Even though the definition is quite accurate, anthropologists of today have manipulated it by replacing the “man” with “humans” or “people” while still using “complex whole” (Miller......

Words: 1481 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Anthropology

...Anthropology: Principles and Concepts Anthropology is all around us. It is the concept which has made it what the world is today. The study is like a window to the past, a mirror to our present life and is like a lens to our future. The principle of anthropology is an understanding of the human life and the condition. A study into the anthropological concepts will help a person understand the human adaptations, both cultural as well as biological which helps us to understand how human beings have adapted in this current generation. The main principles which drive anthropology include analyzing the cultural similarities among human beings, the cultural development among human beings and understanding the biological evolutions as proved by the fossil records in the past. All these factors play an important role in the understanding of the human biological diversity that exists in the world today. In simpler words, anthropology is a study which aims to understand Homo sapiens as a whole. Anthropology has four basic fields-cultural anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology and linguistics. The study of human beings gives a holistic view on the life of the human beings and how they have adapted over time. All these approaches and subfields of anthropology help scientists to study the human behaviour in a much better way. Anthropologists maintain their holistic vision and come up with primary data which enhances the understanding of the human nature and how they have...

Words: 857 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Anthropology

...orientation: Straight Occupation: Anthropologist Nationality: Poland Executive summary: Founder of social anthropology British anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski is remembered as the father of the functionalist school of anthropology as well as for his role in developing the methods and the primacy of anthropological fieldwork. Malinowski first rose to prominent notice through his studies of Pacific Islanders, especially those conducted among the Trobriand Islanders whose marriage, trade, and religious customs he studied extensively. His best known works include his classic book Argonauts of the Western Pacific (1922) as well as Crime and Custom in Savage Society (1926), The Sexual Life of Savages in North-Western Melanesia (1929), and the posthumously published Magic, Science, and Religion and Other Essays (1948). Malinowski helped develop the field of anthropology from a primarily evolutionary focus into sociological and psychological fields of enquiry. Some of the more noteworthy byproducts of his fieldwork in this direction was various evidence that debunked the Freudian notion of a universal Oedipal Complex and also showed that so-called primitive peoples are capable of the same types and levels of cognitive reasoning as those from more "advanced" societies. Malinowski's ideas and methodologies came to be widely embraced by the Boasian influenced school of American Anthropology, making him one of the most influential anthropologists of the 20th century. Bronislaw......

Words: 1863 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Sociology and Cultural Anthropology: Compare and Contrast

...Sociology and Cultural Anthropology: Compare and Contrast Western Governor’s University Issues in Behavioral Science (UG, GLT1-0310) Sociology and cultural anthropology are two of the major social sciences. Sociology is the study of the progress, arrangement, relationship and performance of a group of people. It studies the group in a specific given time frame (Calhoun, 2002). Cultural anthropology is the study of human beings through their ancestors in terms of surroundings, social relationships, language, religious beliefs and the principles of their societies (O’Neil, 2011). Both of these fields are inter-related in the study of a society and social culture but they each use specific research methods that are appropriate for their own course of studies. Sociology identifies associations or correlations between variables in a small group of sample population and applies these findings to a larger population (Calhoun, 2002). Cultural anthropology looks at small groups of people in their studies. Researchers may compare their understandings of the subjects with other cultures we are familiar with, but they do not necessarily have to use these findings to explain other cultures (O’Neil, 2011). Sociologists use five main methods of research that include surveys, interviews, experiments, observations, and secondary analysis (Admin, 2013). Each research method has its positive and negative effects and the study itself determines which tool is best suited,......

Words: 1415 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Problems with Cultural Relativism in Anthropology

...Cultural Relativism and Problems Associated with This Approach Cultural anthropology is the study of cultural variation among people. An essential concept that professional anthropologists apply in their fieldworks is - cultural relativism - an approach to study of the nature and role of values in a culture without judgment and comparison to their own. According to the Study Guide, Smillie and Kenny state that major contribution to the study of the concept of cultural relativism can be attributed to Boas and his students, who challenged a wide-spread idea that societies are staged along a line from the most undeveloped to most “civilized.” Rather, they suggested that each individual culture should be understood in terms of its unique beliefs and ideals. That is, in order to observe and understand how people live and operate in a particular culture, it is important to consider the way other view the world within the framework of their culture. A great example of this idea is depicted by Laura Bohannan in her work “Shakespeare in the bush.” With an argument in mind, that human nature is more or less universal, she travels to Africa and discusses a famous Shakespeare’s tragic play with native people of a tribe Tiv, expecting only slight variations in its interpretation accounted for discrepancies in culture. To her surprise, Bohannan finds out that customs, beliefs, translations and culture have an enormous role in the perception and interpretation of Shakespeare’s play and......

Words: 2156 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Anthropology

...Paulina Para November 2, 2015 Anthropology 101 “Cold Water” Cold Water, directed by Noriko Ogami is a documentary from 1986 about cross-cultural adaptation and culture shock. It is about diving into a new culture and having it feel, as one foreign student puts it, like a “plunge into cold water.” Twelve Boston University foreign students express their perceptions of their experiences in the U.S. as each of them (plus one American student and three specialists) is interviewed about living and studying in a new culture. Initial focus is on the arrival and immediate post-arrival period and the culture shock which, for most of the interviewees, follows on its heels. It becomes clear that central to the problems encountered are major differences in values and behaviors between the foreign students and the Americans they meet. These are discussed with striking insights by both the students and the specialists and cover a range of basic characteristics of American culture: openness/directness, privacy, attitudes toward time, friendship patterns, and competitiveness. Throughout the documentary, the foreign students define the full experience of cultural shock in several different stages. You start off in the stage where you are infatuated with the culture, people and food. Initially, you are excited for the big move and your mind is full of everything but negative thoughts. You are expecting a fun adventure out of this. Moving on to the second stage in which......

Words: 1163 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Cultural Anthropology Essay

...American Economics and Death in Japan Jacob K. Donlan ANT 101: Cultural Anthropology Instructor James Turner September 7, 2015 Introduction This paper will show an overview of the American economic system today from an etic (outsider’s) point of view as well as examine how the Japanese culture treats death from an introspective view to show readers how areas where they may already have an opinion on can be seen from other perspectives. In Part I, readers will be shown from an etic perspective how Americans have, over time, developed an addiction to indebtedness and live in abundance on credit, not caring of growing deficits and interest burdens. In his 2013 book, “Cultural Anthropology,” Crapo describes an etic analysis as “an outsider’s or observer’s allegedly “objective” account.” In Part II, the Japanese culture surrounding death will be described as how an insider would understand it. Crap described an emic analysis as “an insider’s or native’s meaningful account.” (Ch. 1.1). For various cultures around the world to truly understand and empathize with one another, it is important to be able to see things from each other’s perspective. Being able to understand an issue in America as an outsider would see it, and likewise to look at something that might seem strange to us as an insider would will help us grow beyond our preconceived notions and ignorance. Part......

Words: 1490 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Cultural Anthropology

...QN:With the aid of case studies from Africa, explore different leadership strategies of settling disputes Settling disputes refers to one of several different processes used to resolve disputes between parties. This includes negotiation, mediation, arbitration, collaborative law, and litigation. Settling disputes is the process of resolving a dispute or a conflict by meeting at least some of each side’s needs and addressing their interests. Conflict resolution is a community process involving the identification of the root cause of the problem, and bringing all parties involved to address the underlying issues. This usually ends with the guilty accepting wrong doing, leading to reconciliation which may include compensation or just forgiveness (Brock-Utne, 2001) Notable dispute resolved in Africa, was in Kenya. It was a forest conflict which was associated with the Njukiine forest which was managed by the Gichugu Gikuyu and Embu elders. Tension was present in the pre-colonial era for the regulated use of the forest. Colonialism perpetuates dramatic changes which erupted in the 1930. The Gikuyu immigrants, lineage elders, local authorities and colonial administrators all competed to control the use of the forest. A range of groups were involved as different disputes unfolded.Women the most numerous of the major forest users groups were absent in the disputing process. Several means were used to address the disputes which were the local moots, rituals, tribunals, chiefs,......

Words: 1254 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Cultural Anthropology Term Project Autobiographical Family Study

...Cultural Anthropology Term Project Autobiographical Family Study Click Link Below To Buy: http://hwcampus.com/shop/cultural-anthropology-term-project/ The objective is to relate this project to the text readings and to events in your family history. Think enculturation, culture, ethnic background and customs and learn more by asking your family and friends about the events: history, traditions, beliefs, cultural heritage, etc.that make you who you are You may relate it to the entire Social Science group- economics, sociology, philosophy, political science, history, psychology which make up Cultural Anthropology. This is your opportunity to tell your story and that of your family. Remember to cite your paper properly and no plagiarism, all papers will be scanned! Parameters of the Paper Minimum content of 6-7 pages includes the Title Page and a bibliography 12 pt., double spaced report. Spell and Grammar check and submitted (attach the file) in the Assignment drop box by due date posted. Attach the file not a copy of the paper in the drop box. Bibliography or References: Text, interviews or other documentation Text- author, text, publisher, date of publication and pages Interview- name of interviewee, date, relationship to student, how (personal, phone, e-mails, letters etc…. Internet- standard internet format: name of article, author, and website address Please make sure you compose your paper and save...

Words: 768 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Intro to Cultural Anthropology Terminology

...Anthropology – The comparative study of human sciences and cultures. Holistic/Holism – In Anthropology an approach that considers culture, history, language, and biology essential to a complete understanding of human society. Society – A group of people who depend on one another for survival or well-being as well as the relationships among such people, including their status and roles. Culture - The learned behaviors and symbols that allow people to live in groups. The primary means by which humans adapt to their environments. The way of life characteristic of a particular human society. Ethnography – A description of a society or culture. Emic(perspective) – Examining society using concepts, categories, and distinctions that are meaningful to members of that culture. Etic(perspective) – Examining society using concepts, categories, and rules derived from science; an outsider’s perspective, which produces analyses that members of the society being studied may not find meaningful. Ethnology – The attempt to find general principles or laws that govern cultural phenomena. Cultural Anthropology – The study of human thought, meaning, and behavior that is learned rather than genetically transmitted, and that is typical of groups of people. Ethnohistory – Description of the cultural past based on written records, interviews, and archaeology. Linguistic anthropology – A branch of linguistics concerned with understanding language and its relation to culture. Historical......

Words: 1107 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Anthropology

...What is Anthropology??? • • • 20:41 Anthropology • Scientific Approach, OBJECTIVE • Study of Humankind- human groups • Seeks to produce useful GENERALIZATIONS about people and their BEHAVIORS • To arrive at an UNBIASED UNDERSTANDING OF HUMAN DIVERSITY • Only scientific discipline that attempts to embrace an understanding of all of humanity • Helps us understand ourselves an others Anthropology Perspectives • Holistic Approach (broadest view) o To view things in the broadest possible contest o To cover the whole scope of humanity o To provide a total or composite view o Human culture as a system, functional whole, all parts relate o Biocultural Perspective  Studies both the PHYSICAL and SOCIAL  EX: kuru disease (neurological disease)- disease caused by culture, transmitted by mortuary practices • Cultural Relativism o To view the beliefs and customs of other peoples within the context of their culture not one’s own o Practice of not judging other cultures based on the standards of one’s own culture o ENDOCENTRISM  Group centeredness  Tendency to see ones own culture as the center of everything  The measure or standard against which all other lifeways are evaluated  Tendency to consider ones own culture as superior or better than all others o Anthropologists must be unbiased, objective o Involves an effort to remain unbiased in ones observations o Acknowledges that cultures are DIFFERENT, but NOT RANKED o No right or wrong......

Words: 4747 - Pages: 19